APPLICATIONS

Remote Switching Nodes

Backup & Schedules

Fiber Plant surveillance

10Gbps, 40Gbps or 100Gbps signals

Analogue signals

Zero maintenance

AODF capacity can scale by clustering several devices. Hierarchical structure can be implemented by clustering AODF implementing multi-fiber connections with AODF implementing individual fiber connections.

AODF implements access control features to safeguard the integrity of the optical layer infrastructure, preventing unauthorized operation. All communications to and from the AODF are authenticated and encrypted, end-to-end.

More information about AODF for Lab’s automation

A meet-me room MMR is a place within a colocation center (or carrier hotel) where tele-communications companies can physically connect to one another and exchange data without incurring local loop fees. Services provided across connections in an MMR may be voice circuits, data circuits, or Internet protocol traffic.

  •  Faster connections
  •  Reduce human errors
  •  Online monitoring of the optical infrastructure

A meet-me room MMR is a place within a colocation center (or carrier hotel) where tele-communications companies can physically connect to one another and exchange data without incurring local loop fees. Services provided across connections in an MMR may be voice circuits, data circuits, or Internet protocol traffic.

  •  Faster connections
  •  Reduce human errors
  •  Online monitoring of the optical infrastructure

A meet-me room MMR is a place within a colocation center (or carrier hotel) where tele-communications companies can physically connect to one another and exchange data without incurring local loop fees. Services provided across connections in an MMR may be voice circuits, data circuits, or Internet protocol traffic.

  •  Faster connections
  •  Reduce human errors
  •  Online monitoring of the optical infrastructure
  •  Faster connections
  •  Reduce human errors
  •  Online monitoring of the optical infrastructure

Note; Above accordion all content sections are the same ?

More information about AODF for FTTH

Accurate record-keeping

  • Automation of the fiber verification testing and integration after fiber construction
  • Remote control AODF with embedded splitters, allowing immediate assignments of ports to 2nd stage splitters (distributed splitters) or to users (centralized splitters)
  • Load-balancing, to even average load on PONs and improve end-user satisfaction with a potential to additional revenue
  • Variable split-ratio over the life cycle of the network, to meet changing bandwidth requirements and support revenue growth
  • Remote testing & troubleshooting
  • N+1 port & line protection, making it possible to leverage cost-effective access technology deployed for residential customers, into additional market segments such as SME/SMB and cell-sites with a level of reliability matching the target SLA

The potential savings with AODF at the OPEX were reviewed earlier (ref’ section ‎4, and section ‎5), and will be added after we can gather information based on measurable experience from live deployments, in the field. Please check again with TeliSwitch soon for the latest version of this study.

Users are generally connected to splitter ports in sequential order, with a goal to maximize splitter occupancy yielding to the best resources utilization all the way to the OLT ports in the CO. However, service utilization is not known and bottlenecks can develop on the PON segment when several users would order high-bandwidth packages, now in the 200 & 300 Mbps with targets already set for 1Gbps. Traffic balancing is the normal reaction to these situations, rearranging users’ connections in the centralized splitters option (or 2nd stage connections in the distributed topology) in order to spread the heavy users optimally across the splitter and OLT ports. Figure 4 shows a simplified example, where the top PON and its splitter in the top drawing exhibit higher than normal loads, as illustrated with the thick lines. Rearranging the port assignments in the field would be a complex manual task, with many cross-connections involved at the FCP, a significant potential for errors and down-time for some customers, pushing the service provider to reduce to absolute necessary this type of changes, generally when customers have complained for some time. With AODF at the same FCP, the carefully crafted balancing plan is implemented automatically with no errors, as frequently as needed, resulting in higher customer satisfaction which opens the door to higher revenues.

Note; Above accordion all content sections are the same ?

More information about AODF for Landing Stations

The optical module is based on industry-standard latching connectors, guaranteeing the same level of performance of a standard patch-panel. The module is arranged in a patented cylindrical optical geometry.

  • Automating manual ODF capabilities
  • Remote all-optical network – physical layer management
  • Deep dive into the network’s optical layer
  • Remote monitoring & troubleshooting
  • Save-on OPEX & Gain High User Satisfaction
  • High-performance optical switching
  • Meeting Optical Layer Life Expectancy of 40 years
  • Online monitoring of the optical infrastructure
  • Enables an adaptive splitting ratio in PON

More information about AODF for 5G

TeliSwitch has included special access control features in the AODF to safeguard the integrity of the optical layer infrastructure, preventing unauthorized operation. All communications to and from the AODF are authenticated and encrypted, end-to-end.

  • Up to 1000 times increased in bandwidth, per unit area
  • Up to 100 times more connected devices
  • Up to 10Gbps connection rates to mobile devices in the field
  • Perceived network availability of 99.999%
  • A perceived 100% network coverage
  • Maximum of 1ms end-to-end round-trip delay (latency)

AODF ensures second-order survival of the optical infrastructure. First-order survival is guaranteed by the electro-optical equipment operating in two lanes but in the event of a malfunction in the equipment or optical infrastructure, there is no backup for traffic and then the AODF allows a fast connection of an alternative route that is used as a second backup until the fault is repaired.

More information about AODF for FTTH

Accurate record-keeping

  • Automation of the fiber verification testing and integration after fiber construction
  • Remote control AODF with embedded splitters, allowing immediate assignments of ports to 2nd stage splitters (distributed splitters) or to users (centralized splitters)
  • Load-balancing, to even average load on PONs and improve end-user satisfaction with a potential to additional revenue
  • Variable split-ratio over the life cycle of the network, to meet changing bandwidth requirements and support revenue growth
  • Remote testing & troubleshooting
  • N+1 port & line protection, making it possible to leverage cost-effective access technology deployed for residential customers, into additional market segments such as SME/SMB and cell-sites with a level of reliability matching the target SLA

The potential savings with AODF at the OPEX were reviewed earlier (ref’ section ‎4, and section ‎5), and will be added after we can gather information based on measurable experience from live deployments, in the field. Please check again with TeliSwitch soon for the latest version of this study.

Users are generally connected to splitter ports in sequential order, with a goal to maximize splitter occupancy yielding to the best resources utilization all the way to the OLT ports in the CO. However, service utilization is not known and bottlenecks can develop on the PON segment when several users would order high-bandwidth packages, now in the 200 & 300 Mbps with targets already set for 1Gbps. Traffic balancing is the normal reaction to these situations, rearranging users’ connections in the centralized splitters option (or 2nd stage connections in the distributed topology) in order to spread the heavy users optimally across the splitter and OLT ports. Figure 4 shows a simplified example, where the top PON and its splitter in the top drawing exhibit higher than normal loads, as illustrated with the thick lines. Rearranging the port assignments in the field would be a complex manual task, with many cross-connections involved at the FCP, a significant potential for errors and down-time for some customers, pushing the service provider to reduce to absolute necessary this type of changes, generally when customers have complained for some time. With AODF at the same FCP, the carefully crafted balancing plan is implemented automatically with no errors, as frequently as needed, resulting in higher customer satisfaction which opens the door to higher revenues.

More information about AODF for FTTH

Accurate record-keeping

  • Automation of the fiber verification testing and integration after fiber construction
  • Remote control AODF with embedded splitters, allowing immediate assignments of ports to 2nd stage splitters (distributed splitters) or to users (centralized splitters)
  • Load-balancing, to even average load on PONs and improve end-user satisfaction with a potential to additional revenue
  • Variable split-ratio over the life cycle of the network, to meet changing bandwidth requirements and support revenue growth
  • Remote testing & troubleshooting
  • N+1 port & line protection, making it possible to leverage cost-effective access technology deployed for residential customers, into additional market segments such as SME/SMB and cell-sites with a level of reliability matching the target SLA

The potential savings with AODF at the OPEX were reviewed earlier (ref’ section ‎4, and section ‎5), and will be added after we can gather information based on measurable experience from live deployments, in the field. Please check again with TeliSwitch soon for the latest version of this study.

Users are generally connected to splitter ports in sequential order, with a goal to maximize splitter occupancy yielding to the best resources utilization all the way to the OLT ports in the CO. However, service utilization is not known and bottlenecks can develop on the PON segment when several users would order high-bandwidth packages, now in the 200 & 300 Mbps with targets already set for 1Gbps. Traffic balancing is the normal reaction to these situations, rearranging users’ connections in the centralized splitters option (or 2nd stage connections in the distributed topology) in order to spread the heavy users optimally across the splitter and OLT ports. Figure 4 shows a simplified example, where the top PON and its splitter in the top drawing exhibit higher than normal loads, as illustrated with the thick lines. Rearranging the port assignments in the field would be a complex manual task, with many cross-connections involved at the FCP, a significant potential for errors and down-time for some customers, pushing the service provider to reduce to absolute necessary this type of changes, generally when customers have complained for some time. With AODF at the same FCP, the carefully crafted balancing plan is implemented automatically with no errors, as frequently as needed, resulting in higher customer satisfaction which opens the door to higher revenues.